The declaration of the right of the people to "pump" their own gasoline

  • Posted on: 6 March 2019
  • By: Henry Zeigerson
Bill Number: 
WFCVII3
Legislature: 
Primary Chamber: 
Title: 
An Act reinstating the right to transfer gasoline without regulation
Enactment Clause: 
Be it enacted by the Youth Model Legislature of the State of New Jersey that The Retail Gasoline Dispensing Safety Act shall be repealed in favour of allowing all citizens capable to transfer their own gasoline to do so.
Sections: 
Section I: The Retail Gasoline Dispensing Safety Act on the effective date of this bill shall be repealed. The regulations required by the law are henceforth null and void. New regulations are to be followed as defined and amended.
Section II: At all public and commercial sources, it shall no longer be regulated for employees to attend to the transfer of fuel or gasoline to autos unless otherwise requested or required.
Section III: It shall be regulated that at the minimum there be one attendant to assist in the event of physical necessity or emergency. Specifying; in the event that the operator of an auto is incapable of the purchase and transfer of fuel physically, there shall be an employee trained to assist.
Section IV: The training received shall be to the discretion of the employer as well as comply with all road safety laws.
Effective Date: 
This bill shall take effect January 31, 2020, as to allow for preparations.
Statement of Intent: 
The purpose of this bill is to reinstate the people's right to attend to their property/autos as the former regulation is seen as unnecessary oversight, as well as a limit to the economy as people remain in the unskilled workspace unnecessarily.
Author's Note: 
Financial statement: Any and all necessary funds shall remain to a minimum and to those necessary only to the implementation and execution of this bill. The implementation of this law will fall under the jurisdiction of The New Jersey Department of Transportation.
Lobbyist Consideration: 
Yes
Speedpass Consideration: 
No